And Speaking of NEEM

October 9, 2009

Has anyone else noticed how much the iconic NEEM dome. . .NEEMDome

. . . looks like the Omnidroid from The Incredibles?

Omnidroid2

Just sayin’.

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The Weather Channel Features NEEM and ANG 109th

October 9, 2009

Watch Saturday/Sunday 7 -10am EDT

Robbie Score in front of the NEEM dome. Photo: Ed. Stockard

Robbie Score in front of the NEEM dome. Photo: Ed Stockard

Those of us in the U.S. wishing to visit the U Copenhagen-led NEEM drilling camp (or to fly with the Air National Guard 109th Airlift Wing) on the Greenland ice sheet should tune in to the Weather Channel this Saturday and Sunday (October 10 and 11) between 7am and 11am EDT. A crew from StormCenter (Dan Cohen, Steven Holloway, Rick Patterson and Heidi Cullen from Climate Central) visited Greenland last July and produced some stories about NEEM and the ANG that air this weekend.

Whet your appetite with video clips posted on the StormCenter Web site; they do a great job of putting you on the ice sheet, in the core rooms, in the cockpit with the Guard flight crew. They also make it clear that for everyone doing the work, it’s more than a job. NEEM field coordinator JP Steffensen (U Copenhagen) refers to his 29 years of research in Greenland as a “marriage for life” while ANG Lt. Col George Alston says the mission is “a great way to contribute to the nation.” And the woman with the biggest NEEM title of all, Chief Scientist Dorthe Dahl-Jensen, she can’t suppress a grin when she admits she just “wants to work with the cores.”

The ANG provides the airlift muscle to the drilling camp, and the footage inside the cockpit looks great. “We shot some amazing footage,” agrees Dave Jones, head of StormCenter, “and we will continue to tell the stories that need to be told.” Jones has particularly kind words for the ANG, writing, “I can’t tell you how proud I am that the 109th exists! Thank you for all you do to advance our understanding of science and global climate change.”


Ice, Ice, Baby!

August 28, 2009

Over a mile of ice core taken at the NEEM camp, which sets a new drilling record.

Cores taken from deep in the ice sheet are under enormous pressure. When brought to the surface where pressure is much less, they can shatter. To avoid this, deep ice cores are stored in a buffer to 'relax' before they are moved. NEEM cores may rest in the buffer for up to a year before being moved. Photo: Sune Olander Rasmussen. NEEM ice core drilling project, www.neem.ku.dk.

Cores taken from deep in the ice sheet are under enormous pressure. When brought to the surface where pressure is lower, they can shatter. To avoid this, deep ice cores are stored in a buffer to 'relax' before they are moved. NEEM cores may rest in the buffer for up to a year. Photo: Sune Olander Rasmussen. NEEM ice core drilling project, http://www.neem.ku.dk.

Congratulations to chief scientist Dorthe Dahl-Jensen (University of Copenhagen) and the international NEEM team on a dream season!

Read the National Science Foundation press release.


Up in the Air

June 24, 2009

Through Ed Stockard’s Viewfinder

The view from the port-hole-style windows of an LC-130.

The view from the port-hole-style windows of an LC-130.

The above is “an unidentified glacier south of Rink Isbrae (icestream), location N 71 deg 27 min  W 51 deg 26 min,” Ed writes. “I was sharing this window with some enthusiastic journalists that prevented a clean shot.” We bet they also had a few window frames in their shots too, thanks to Ed.

"Dang dirty windows."

"Dang dirty windows." Ed shoots Rink Isbrae, where a Jason Box time-lapse camera continuously documents the changing icescape. "Note the large broken-off piece floating next to the tongue," Ed says.

Ed Stockard flew to the NEEM ice camp recently with a group of media personnel. He and colleague Robbie Score were able to photograph the NEEM tunnels, where all the action takes place. Stay tuned.